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BackDECC makes sweet music Associate Dean

DECC makes sweet music

Together they explored how to activate your ‘best self’ and use it to achieve amazing things. The day ended with a symphony of sound as they were taught how to play a piece of orchestral music from scratch. Watch a quick snippet from the day.
 
Julia Marsh, Associate Dean, commented: ‘I was delighted at the way that everyone came together and engaged so fully in the activities and learning during the day. There was an incredible energy in the room that we can now apply to delivering our goals for the year ahead.’
 
The context for the day was provided by Dan Cable, author of Alive: the Neuroscience of Helping Your People Love What They Do. He explained the tension that exists in the work context between the seeking system – responsible for our innate desire to experiment, learn from our environment and seek meaning – and the fear system. However, there are things we can all do to activate our seeking system and thus be our best self.
 
‘As a new starter, the timing of this event was ideal’ noted Caroline Mayo, Career Coach, ‘ This is my first job in higher education and it was great to have exposure to one of the faculty and to feel part of the wider learning community at LBS.’
 
Alexandra White concurred. ‘I thoroughly enjoyed the day. Dan Cable gave me a lot to think about, seeing my purpose in a different light and engaging my seeking brain.’
 
When you activate your best self great things can happen as a team, department and School. At the Away Day this was explored in relation to helping deliver the School’s three priorities and DECC’s own strategy for 2018/19.
 
St Luke’s is an 18th-century, Grade 1 listed Hawksmoor church that was bombed during World War II. It has been restored to become the home of the London Symphony Orchestra’s community and music education programme. It was therefore fitting that the afternoon finished with the debut of the DECC Orchestra.
 
Participants were given an instrument to play – be it violin, viola, cello, trombone or percussion – and under two hours to master a musical score. 
 
‘It was a great, fun day,’ said Monique Cordwell, Programme Administrator, ‘and so nice to mingle with different teams. I also did something that I thought wasn’t possible – playing a cello that was about twice as big as I am.’ Now that’s music to my ears!